Cannoli Pepperoni

Est. 2013

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The Boxer At Rest

Posted on November 25, 2013

Last Sunday Peter and I ventured off the Academy hill to the Palazzo Massimo alle Terme. We’ve been slowly building a list of museums and sights to see in Rome and just as slowly checking things off the list. The beauty of being here for almost a year is there’s no pressure–at least right now–to sightsee. We can drink in Rome’s history like a rich digestif, slowly sipping so that it settles nicely. I’ve never been so aware of stretching out an experience, but that’s what this year is like. It feels like the more gradually I take everything in, the longer the memories will last.

Palazzo Massimo is a gorgeous museum with a large collection of ancient mosaics, one of the most vividly-colored intact frescoes I’ve ever seen, and the haunting 4th century B.C. bronze sculpture, “Boxer at Rest.” Can you imagine what it would have been like to be the archeologist who discovered this wondrous object in 1885? You can see the scars etched on the boxer’s face. You can get so close that he almost looks real (until you set the sensors off, like I did, and are jarred out of your reverie). We wandered through the galleries, blissfully alone in most of them, until we’d had enough. How do you follow up an afternoon of beautiful art? With pastries of course. So we stopped at L’arte del Pane for a sweet nibble and then we got on the bus to go back home.

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Il Stormo di Storni

Posted on November 20, 2013

We are in the midst of Starling Season in Rome. We are just a stop along the way to Africa for the thousands of birds making their migration, but at the moment it feels like they’ve decided to stay. I noticed them first outside my bedroom window at the Academy. Typical bird chatter would suddenly grow deafening around 4 o’clock, when they’d all come to roost in the Umbrella Pines across the street. It’s a throbbing hum so loud it goes through glass. It goes right into your head, too, so good luck trying to concentrate on anything. The birds congregated for no more than half an hour, but then they were off. To where? I couldn’t tell. But I discovered their roosting spot…

Going Up

Posted on November 15, 2013

We live on top of one of Rome’s many hills. The view is incredible, but there’s a price to pay. If you head down the hill you must go back up (sometimes several times a day). Before I show you what our view looks like, I thought I’d show you some of the staircases we’re becoming well-acquainted with.

A Weekend in Cinque Terre

Posted on November 6, 2013

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A word about Cinque Terre: you must go there. Even after reading about it, looking at pictures of it and dreaming about what our weekend might be like, I was not prepared for its beauty. In addition to not being an anchovy eater (or so I thought), I am not a hiker. But if you go, you must hike between the villages. Besides dinner at Trattoria da Oscar, hiking between the towns was my favorite experience. There were two trails open when we were there—one from Monterosso to Vernazza and the other from Vernazza to Corniglia. Both were fairly challenging and ran about an hour and a half, but not so tough that we needed special hiking gear to get through them. We had good shoes and a bottle of water to share and were fine. Just a few minutes into our first hike, I understood why so many people come here. The way each village reveals itself as you slowly make your way toward it is part of the magic of the Cinque Terre. I’ve never seen such stunning views in my life.

Anchovies Three Ways

Posted on November 3, 2013

We waited patiently outside the humble entrance to Trattoria di Oscar. It was our final night in Monterosso as well as our last in the Cinque Terre. A tiny, gorgeous stretch of Ligurian coastline, Cinque Terre is made up of five candy-colored villages built right into the rocky cliffs: Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore. Five villages linked by four hiking trails, one train and the occasional boat. After a terrible lunch in Corniglia (lured by a sunny piazza we chose a place that somehow managed to make gnocci inedible), I wanted this dinner to count. With the warmth of the sun several hours gone, there was no mistaking the brisk chill hanging in the air. I thought the more humble we…